A short film competition to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS among youth

The Red Ribbon Short Film Competition, also known as The Red Ribbon Shorties, is calling for entries. Initiated in 2015, the film competition is given a new life with the help of the Yayasan Sime Darby Sponsorship. This year, Art Against AIDS – a charity art platform to educate and spread the awareness of HIV and AIDS, is coming on board as an official partner; proffer an extension for the entry submission to the 28th of September 2021.

The competition aims to encourage Malaysian youth aged between 13 – 30 years old to gain interest in HIV/AIDS, do thorough research about the topic and present these issues in a short film format (less than 5 minutes). Entrants will be judged on both technical merit and the accuracy of the content. With the Red Ribbon Shorties, we wish to create an artistic platform that activates youngsters’ interest, attracts film enthusiasts and stakeholders to generate dialogues within the whole society about key issues related to the epidemic of HIV/AIDS.

The Red Ribbon Shorties also marks a major step in our AIDS awareness programme as we seek to promote more direct youth participation in creating the campaign content, most notably secondary and tertiary education students. By taking part in the short film contest, our participants will embark on a journey of discovery when they conduct their research on the various issues related to HIV/AIDS during their film-making process. The themes for this year revolve around sexual transmission, advances in HIV treatment and prevention and also stigma and discrimination experienced by people living with HIV (PLHIV).

The Malaysian AIDS Foundation aims to set a higher bar with the revival of the Red Ribbon Short Film Competition. To ensure the credibility of the competition, the selection process will be presided by a panel of distinguished personalities representing the entertainment industry, media, civil society and people living with HIV. Winners of the Red Ribbon Short Film Competition will be announced in the month of November.

THE THEME

Sexual Transmission

Advancement in HIV Treatment
and Prevention

Stigma and Discrimination

VIDEO REQUIREMENTS

Duration: Maximum 5 minutes (including titles and credits)

Video Format: High Definition (MP4)

Form / Genre: No limitation to the type of genre

Language: English (other languages must be accompanied with English subtitles)

CATEGORIES & PRIZE

SECONDARY STUDENT

Form 1 to Form 5 secondary education students (13 – 17 years old)

TERTIARY STUDENT/PUBLIC

University, college students and public (18 to 30 years)

PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD

All video submissions from both categories

HOW TO JOIN

ELIGIBILITY

  1. The competition is open to all Malaysian citizens and/or permanent residents, aged between 13 – 30 years, with no entry fee charged; in the following categories:
    – Secondary Education Students (13 – 17 years old)
    – Tertiary Education Students/Public (18 – 30 years old)
  2. Participants are required to download and read the HIV 101 KIT that has been prepared on the official website before participating in the competition.
  3. Films should be no longer than 5 minutes, including titles and credits.
  4. Films must be original pieces of work and contain no copyright material without permission.
  5. Films should be submitted in high-definition MP4 format through the official website of the competition.
  6. All forms/genre of work are accepted, including animation, documentary, drama or musical, etc.
  7. English is the preferred medium. Submission in any other languages must be accompanied with English subtitles.
  1. The primary contact completing the submission process must be authorised to submit the film(s) and must have obtained permission for the inclusion of copyrighted materials within the film, when necessary.
  2. The film must not contain the following: a. Sensitive topics regarding race/religion/politics and etc. b. Any other topics that may contain elements which are sensitive in nature.
  3. Commercial or advertisement (product placement) is not allowed.

NOTE: Due to the current COVID-19 outbreak, participants are encouraged to use their creativity to work with the limitations of staying indoors during the Movement Control Order and practising social distancing. We do not encourage participants to work with their film in high-risk situations and conditions e.g. crowded places, meeting with more than 20 people in one place.

EVENT TIMELINE

05.07.21 Entries open
28.09.21 Entries close
soon People’s Choice Award Voting
soon Announcement of winners online

A short film competition to raise awareness about HIV and AIDS among youth

The Red Ribbon Short Film Competition, also known as The Red Ribbon Shorties, is call for entries. Initiated in 2015, the film competition is given a new life with the help of the Yayasan Sime Darby Sponsorship. This year, Art Against AIDS – a charity art platform to educate and spread the awareness of HIV and AIDS, is coming on board as an official partner; proffer an extension for the entry submission to the 28th of September 2021.

The competition aims to encourage Malaysian youth aged between 13 – 30 years old to gain interest in HIV/AIDS, do thorough research about the topic and present these issues in a short film format (less than 5 minutes). Entrants will be judged on both technical merit and the accuracy of the content. With the Red Ribbon Shorties, we wish to create an artistic platform that activates youngsters’ interest, attracts film enthusiasts and stakeholders to generate dialogues within the whole society about key issues related to the epidemic of HIV/AIDS.

The Red Ribbon Shorties also marks a major step in our AIDS awareness programme as we seek to promote more direct youth participation in creating the campaign content, most notably secondary and tertiary education students. By taking part in the short film contest, our participants will embark on a journey of discovery when they conduct their research on the various issues related to HIV/AIDS during their film-making process. The themes for this year revolve around sexual transmission, advances in HIV treatment and prevention and also stigma and discrimination experienced by people living with HIV (PLHIV).

The Malaysian AIDS Foundation aims to set a higher bar with the revival of the Red Ribbon Short Film Competition. To ensure the credibility of the competition, the selection process will be presided by a panel of distinguished personalities representing the entertainment industry, media, civil society and people living with HIV. Winners of the Red Ribbon Short Film Competition will be announced in the month of November.

THE THEME

Sexual Transmission

Advancement in HIV Treatment
and Prevention

Stigma and Discrimination

VIDEO REQUIREMENTS

Duration: Maximum 5 minutes (including titles and credits)

Video Format: High Definition (MP4)

Form / Genre: No limitation to the type of genre

Language: English (other languages must be accompanied with English subtitles)

CATEGORIES & PRIZE

SECONDARY STUDENT

Form 1 to Form 5 secondary education students
(13 – 17 years old)

TERTIARY STUDENT/PUBLIC

University, college students and public
(18 to 30 years)

PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD

All video submissions from both categories

HOW TO JOIN

ELIGIBILITY

  1. The competition is open to all Malaysian citizens and/or permanent residents, aged between 13 – 30 years, with no entry fee charged; in the following categories:
    – Secondary Education Students (13 – 17 years old)
    – Tertiary Education Students/Public (18 – 30 years old)
  2. Participants are required to download and read the HIV 101 KIT that has been prepared on the official website before participating in the competition.
  3. Films should be no longer than 5 minutes, including titles and credits.
  4. Films must be original pieces of work and contain no copyright material without permission.
  5. Films should be submitted in high-definition MP4 format through the official website of the competition and our official YouTube Channel Malaysian AIDS Foundation.
  6. All forms/genre of work are accepted, including animation, documentary, drama or musical, etc.
  7. English is the preferred medium. Submission in any other languages must be accompanied with English subtitles.
  8. The primary contact completing the submission process must be authorised to submit the film(s) and must have obtained permission for the inclusion of copyrighted materials within the film, when necessary.
  9. The film must not contain the following: a. Sensitive topics regarding race/religion/politics and etc. b. Any other topics that may contain elements which are sensitive in nature.
  10. Commercial or advertisement (product placement) is not allowed.

NOTE: Due to the current COVID-19 outbreak, participants are encouraged to use their creativity to work with the limitations of staying indoors during the Movement Control Order and practising social distancing. We do not encourage participants to work with their film in high-risk situations and conditions e.g. crowded places, meeting with more than 20 people in one place.

EVENT TIMELINE

05.07.21 Entries open
28.09.21 Entries close
soon People’s Choice Award Voting
soon Announcement of winners online

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THEME 1

SEXUAL TRANSMISSION

INTRODUCTION
This theme seeks to encompass awareness on the sexual transmission of HIV and the various methods in preventing the spread of the virus.
DESCRIPTION
Malaysia’s HIV epidemic started with transmission via injected drug use, which was the main mode of transmission in the early 1990s. After the harm reduction programme, where clean needles were provided for drug users, the main mode of transmission shifted to unprotected sexual intercourse in Malaysia as transmission via injected drug use remarkably decreased. As of 2018, sexual transmission contributed to 94% of the HIV cases in Malaysia. Among that, 37% are from men with women sexual intercourse while 57% are from men with men sexual intercourse. Films submitted under this theme must address the importance of awareness towards sexual transmission of HIV and the importance of safe sex. The theme can also expand on the social acceptance by society towards sexual and reproductive health education and its importance in reducing HIV transmission through unprotected sexual intercourse.
EXAMPLES
  • HIV cases among youths.
  • High-risk groups such as MSM (men who have sex with men) and sex workers.
  • High-risk behaviour such as multiple sex partners and unprotected sex.
  • Condom use demonstration and safe sex promotion.
  • The need for sexual and reproductive health education.
  • Challenging taboos, myths and misconceptions related to sex and HIV transmission.
THEME 2

ADVANCEMENT IN HIV TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

INTRODUCTION
 
Films submitted under this theme must encompass the breakthroughs of modern medicine in improving the lives of people living with HIV (PLHIV) and its role in preventing the spread of HIV.
 
DESCRIPTION
 
The advent of modern medicine has achieved what was thought to be impossible a decade ago. HIV treatment (antiretroviral therapy (ART)) has come a long way since it first commenced. ART has now been proven to be able to reduce the viral load of HIV in people living with HIV to a miniscule amount that it enables zero transmission of the virus from person-to-person via sexual transmission. This enables PLHIV to live normal lives and pose no threat to their intimate partners. This enables them to produce healthy HIV-free families. This concept is better known as treatment as prevention or undetectable equals to untransmittable. Another amazing breakthrough in HIV/AIDS prevention is the discovery of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). PrEP is used for HIV negative people who are at high risk of being infected with HIV to take precautionary steps in preventing the chance of an infection. PEP, on the other hand, is used as an emergency medication for those who are already exposed to the infection within 72 hours. Films submitted under this theme must address the new advancements in HIV medicine and the impact it brings to PLHIV and the people around them in improving their quality of life and reducing the stigma against PLHIV.
 
EXAMPLES
 
  • A PLHIV mother cannot transmit her virus to her unborn child when she achieves undetectable viral load once on effective treatment.
  • A PLHIV can marry their partner without worry of transmission of the virus if their partner is on PrEP.
  • A person who is involved in high-risk behaviour can take emergency PEP to prevent any possible HIV infection that takes place within 72 hours.
THEME 3

STIGMA AND DISCRIMINATION

INTRODUCTION
This theme seeks to challenge HIV and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination and explore its negative impact on people living with HIV and other key populations most affected by the epidemic in terms of self and social acceptance, access to HIV prevention and treatment services, education and employment opportunities as well as many other aspects of everyday life.
DESCRIPTION
HIV and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination refer to negative perceptions and attitudes, misconceptions, prejudice and abuse directed at people living with HIV. Despite the remarkable progress made in advancing HIV science, stigma and discrimination, which is based on the fear surrounding the early AIDS pandemic in the 1980s, continue to persist to this day. The consequences of stigma and discrimination are invariably devastating. Some people are shunned by family, friends, community and society, while others face poor treatment in healthcare and education settings, violation of their human rights, and psychological damage. These push people living with HIV and key populations further underground, limiting their access to HIV prevention, testing, treatment and other life-saving health services. Films submitted under this theme must address the devastating impact of and showcase ways to challenge HIV and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination, examples of which are described below.
EXAMPLES
  • An employee living with HIV is terminated by his/her employer due to his/her HIV status.
  • A doctor refuses to treat, or reacts negatively to a patient who is HIV positive.
  • A university student, who has just recently been diagnosed with HIV, is fearful about being found out and discriminated against by his/her peers and lecturers.
THEME 1

SEXUAL TRANSMISSION

INTRODUCTION
This theme seeks to encompass awareness on the sexual transmission of HIV and the various methods in preventing the spread of the virus.
DESCRIPTION
Malaysia’s HIV epidemic started with transmission via injected drug use, which was the main mode of transmission in the early 1990s. After the harm reduction programme, where clean needles were provided for drug users, the main mode of transmission shifted to unprotected sexual intercourse in Malaysia as transmission via injected drug use remarkably decreased. As of 2018, sexual transmission contributed to 94% of the HIV cases in Malaysia. Among that, 37% are from men with women sexual intercourse while 57% are from men with men sexual intercourse. Films submitted under this theme must address the importance of awareness towards sexual transmission of HIV and the importance of safe sex. The theme can also expand on the social acceptance by society towards sexual and reproductive health education and its importance in reducing HIV transmission through unprotected sexual intercourse.
EXAMPLES
  • HIV cases among youths.
  • High-risk groups such as MSM (men who have sex with men) and sex workers.
  • High-risk behaviour such as multiple sex partners and unprotected sex.
  • Condom use demonstration and safe sex promotion.
  • The need for sexual and reproductive health education.
  • Challenging taboos, myths and misconceptions related to sex and HIV transmission.
THEME 2

ADVANCEMENT IN HIV TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

INTRODUCTION
Films submitted under this theme must encompass the breakthroughs of modern medicine in improving the lives of people living with HIV (PLHIV) and its role in preventing the spread of HIV.
DESCRIPTION
The advent of modern medicine has achieved what was thought to be impossible a decade ago. HIV treatment (antiretroviral therapy (ART)) has come a long way since it first commenced. ART has now been proven to be able to reduce the viral load of HIV in people living with HIV to a miniscule amount that it enables zero transmission of the virus from person-to-person via sexual transmission. This enables PLHIV to live normal lives and pose no threat to their intimate partners. This enables them to produce healthy HIV-free families. This concept is better known as treatment as prevention or undetectable equals to untransmittable. Another amazing breakthrough in HIV/AIDS prevention is the discovery of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). PrEP is used for HIV negative people who are at high risk of being infected with HIV to take precautionary steps in preventing the chance of an infection. PEP, on the other hand, is used as an emergency medication for those who are already exposed to the infection within 72 hours. Films submitted under this theme must address the new advancements in HIV medicine and the impact it brings to PLHIV and the people around them in improving their quality of life and reducing the stigma against PLHIV.
EXAMPLES
  • A PLHIV mother cannot transmit her virus to her unborn child when she achieves undetectable viral load once on effective treatment.
  • A PLHIV can marry their partner without worry of transmission of the virus if their partner is on PrEP.
  • A person who is involved in high-risk behaviour can take emergency PEP to prevent any possible HIV infection that takes place within 72 hours.
THEME 3

STIGMA AND DISCRIMINATION

INTRODUCTION
This theme seeks to challenge HIV and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination and explore its negative impact on people living with HIV and other key populations most affected by the epidemic in terms of self and social acceptance, access to HIV prevention and treatment services, education and employment opportunities as well as many other aspects of everyday life.
DESCRIPTION
HIV and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination refer to negative perceptions and attitudes, misconceptions, prejudice and abuse directed at people living with HIV. Despite the remarkable progress made in advancing HIV science, stigma and discrimination, which is based on the fear surrounding the early AIDS pandemic in the 1980s, continue to persist to this day. The consequences of stigma and discrimination are invariably devastating. Some people are shunned by family, friends, community and society, while others face poor treatment in healthcare and education settings, violation of their human rights, and psychological damage. These push people living with HIV and key populations further underground, limiting their access to HIV prevention, testing, treatment and other life-saving health services. Films submitted under this theme must address the devastating impact of and showcase ways to challenge HIV and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination, examples of which are described below.
EXAMPLES
  • An employee living with HIV is terminated by his/her employer due to his/her HIV status.
  • A doctor refuses to treat, or reacts negatively to a patient who is HIV positive.
  • A university student, who has just recently been diagnosed with HIV, is fearful about being found out and discriminated against by his/her peers and lecturers.